Project Funding

SAMHSA State Targeted Response to the Opioid Crisis Grant

In April of 2017, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) awarded the Mississippi Department of Mental Health Bureau of Behavioral Health-Addictive Services a $3.58 million State Targeted Response (STR) to the Opioid Crisis Grant. This grant has allowed the state to expand access to opioid treatment, implement a broad range of prevention strategies, and train mental health care providers.

In October 2018, DMH received a two-year grant for $7.6 million from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The State Opioid Response (SOR) Grant is designed to address unmet treatment needs, reduce opioid overdose deaths and increase access to medication-assisted treatment (MAT) in the state.

A majority of the funding through this grant has been allocated to providers of substance use disorder services. The funding has also helped strengthen statewide prevention services, which includes the purchase and distribution of Narcan (naloxone) to law enforcement officers in high-risk areas to combat overdose deaths.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration is committed to funding programs that advance recovery defined as a process of change through which individuals improve their health and wellness, live a self-directed life, and strive to reach their full potential.

SAMHSA MPACC Grant

In 2015, the Mississippi Department of Mental Health was awarded a federal 5-year discretionary prevention grant to establish a program aimed at preventing prescription drug misuse among the 18-24-year-old population. The grant program, the Mississippi Prevention Alliance for Communities and Colleges (mPACC), is designed to coordinate and leverage prevention efforts at all levels of government while promoting public health by reducing substance misuse and mental illness among Mississippians.

The goals of this effort are to:

  • Reduce consequences related to prescription drug misuse among adolescent and young adult Mississippians,
  • Reduce prescription drug misuse rates for 12 – 25-year olds, and
  • Reduce statewide prescription drug related consequences